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Growing Minds is a program of Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project. ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food.

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Worms

Teach students about life cycles by learning about worms and the ways they benefit the garden and farms. Through reading literature and completing hands-on activities, the class will conduct a worm investigation and observe that the organisms (and other animals) need food, air and space to grow.

Downloads

A simple book about the life cycle of the earthworm.

You learn a bit about worms and keeping a diary–and you get plenty of laughs. (For instance, one page reads “June 15 – My older sister thinks she’s so pretty. I told her that no matter how much time she spends looking in the mirror, her face will always look just like her rear end.” See?)

Each quarter, ASAP’s Growing Minds co-hosts a school garden meeting with an area school. The winter meeting was held at Hall Fletcher Elementary, a school with an active garden program. Despite it being the middle of December there was still a lot to see and learn.

This delightful read will inform young “environmental chefs” about the do’s and don’ts of composting.  Mary McKenna Siddals draws you in by mentioning familiar household items that can be composted, but also introduces some not-so-familiar composting substances that will leave students wanting to dig deeper (both figuratively and literally)!

Each page delves into a different aspect of composting, from the needs of the heap to the decomposers that dwell in compost. Don’t forget to look for fun facts scattered throughout this book and step by step instructions for creating compost in a bag!

In this book, a young boy decides to observe and take note of everything growing in his garden.  This is a great read for young children who are just learning how to count, and adults will appreciate that it encourages them to eat healthy and local food!

You learn a bit about worms and keeping a diary–and you get plenty of laughs. (For instance, one page reads “June 15 – My older sister thinks she’s so pretty. I told her that no matter how much time she spends looking in the mirror, her face will always look just like her rear end.” See?)