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Growing Minds is a program of Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project. ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food.

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Worms

Curious about vermi-composting for your classroom? This book offers an investigative look at worms as decomposers.

All about worms and how they reproduce and grow. Each page of this book is filled with colorful photographs that serve as fantastic visual aids for the text.

What happens undergound? Creatures dig, plants put down roots, worms tunnel… This book introduces students to the vast array of life that occurs under the ground.

Worms wiggle all over the garden, tunneling through the dirt, helping plants to grow strong and healthy. This book is all about the life of a worm, from what it eats to the way it moves to the benefits it has in your garden. Students will be interested to study their slimy playground pals, and will learn that worms are actually very helpful to farmers and gardeners.

Winnie Finn loves worms so much she wants to win a prize for them at the state fair. Sadly, there is no trophy for worms. Winnie gets clever and, using her worms, helps three friends win first prize at the fair instead. This story describes the variety of ways worms can be helpful to gardeners and shows the benefits of solving problems creatively.

You learn a bit about worms and keeping a diary–and you get plenty of laughs. (For instance, one page reads “June 15 – My older sister thinks she’s so pretty. I told her that no matter how much time she spends looking in the mirror, her face will always look just like her rear end.” See?)

You learn a bit about worms and keeping a diary–and you get plenty of laughs. (For instance, one page reads “June 15 – My older sister thinks she’s so pretty. I told her that no matter how much time she spends looking in the mirror, her face will always look just like her rear end.” See?)

Told from the perspective of a young boy gardening with his grandmother, this book shares lots of interesting worm facts in the format of a fictional story.